Tall Ship Mural on the Building

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Nautical Themed Ideas

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Wooden Oars Decorating

Bring a Classy Look With Ship Models

Nautical Decor and Ideas

Nautical Lighting To Complete Nautical Themed Room

Wooden Decorative Oars Will Bring Endless Summer Into Life

Decorating With Sailboat Models

Decorative Ship’s Wheel

Bring Nautical Ambiance to Your Home With Nautical Decor

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Baltimore Clipper Harvey

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Baltimore Clipper Under Sails image sourceMODEL SHIP- OMH INC

Baltimore Clipper Model Ship Now on Sale 

The Harvey was built in 1847 in the state of Maryland. She was an able sailer working out of the port of Galveston Texas. At the turn out the Century she was making several voyages a year between Galveston and the ancient Jewish port of Jaffa which at the time was still under the Ottaman empire. Her main cargo was hemp used to make ropes for the rigging of ships. She exemplified this class of roving privateers, overtaking and capturing British merchantmen laden with cargo to support the British expeditionary forces then attempting to recapture the former colonies. She had a successful career, first as a warrior and then as a cargo carrier. She displaced about 225 tons, and had a length of 97 feet, a width of 25 feet and a depth of less than 11 feet. With the end of the war, transatlantic trade resumed, and the Baltimore clipper evolved over the next 30 years to take the form of larger cargo carrying packets. These had similar hull lines and were longer, slimmer, and faster than older merchant ships.

Decorative Ship Porthole

porthole-mirror-with-storageDecorative Porthole Mirror with Storage makes perfect nautical wall decor and functional porthole cabinet

Schooner “Californian”

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Schooner “Californian”

Californian was built in 1984 as a replica of the revenue service cutter C.W. Lawrence which operated off the Californian coast in the 1850s. She is known as the “Official Tall ship Ambassador for the State of California”,

A precursor to today’s Coast Guard, the Revenue Cutter Service was responsible for securing the tax revenue and to relieve distressed merchant vessels, much as the United States Coast Guard operates today.

Originally commissioned by the Nautical Heritage Society, she’s flown the Californian flag up and down the Californian coast and in ports ranging from Hawaii, Mexico, and the East Coast.

Recently acquired by the Maritime Museum of San Diego, she underwent a complete overhaul and has now returned to providing sail training and sea educational programs up and down the Californian coast

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Decorating with Nautical Theme Lighting

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Anchor Fixture Chandelier Rustic Design Nautical Themed Lighting 

rustik-armada-four-light-chandelierRustic Armada Four Lights Chandelier 

3-light-escotilha-nautical-chandelierTree Lights Nautical Theme Chandelier 

24-inch-tall-foyer-pendant-from-the-hatch-collection

Exterior Nautical Themed Hatch Collection Fixture 

CSS Alabama Warship

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Warship CSS Alabama

CSS Alabama was a screw sloop-of-war built for the Confederate States Navy at Birkenhead, England in 1862 by John Laird Sons and Company of Birkenhead. Alabama served as a commerce raider, attacking Union merchant and naval ships over the course of her two-year career, during which she never laid anchor in a Southern port.

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CSS ALABAMA

History

Alabama was built by British shipbuilders in 1862. Launched as Enrica, she was fitted out as a cruiser and commissioned August 24, 1862 as CSS Alabama. Under Captain Raphael Semmes, Alabama spent the next two months capturing and burning ships in the North Atlantic and intercepting grain ships bound for Europe. Continuing her path of destruction through the West Indies, Alabama sank USS Hatteras along the Texas coast and captured her crew. After a visit to Cape Town, South Africa, Alabama sailed for the East Indies where the ship spent six…

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